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Hall of Fame - 1994

Hall of Fame - Class of 1994


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Hank Aaron

Hank Aaron

Hit .362 with 22 HR and 125 RBIs for Jacksonville in the South Atlantic League in 1953. Hank Aaron is Baseball's all-time home run leader with 755 and all-time RBI king with 2297. Aaron is a two-time batting champion, four-time home run king, and four-time RBI champion. Aaron was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982.

Harmon Killebrew

Harmon Killebrew

Harmon Killebrew hit .325 for Charlotte in the SAL in 1956. Killebrew slugged 573 home runs in his 22-year major league career. He is a six-time American League home run champion and three-time RBI king. Killebrew was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.

Don Mattingly

Don Mattingly

Don Mattingly led the South Atlantic League with a .358 average and 177 hits in 1980 while playing for the Greensboro Hornets. Mattingly played 12 years with the New York Yankees and has a lifetime batting average of .309. Mattingly was the 1984 American League batting champion (.343), the 1985 RBI king (145), and a six-time American League All-Star.

John H. Moss

John H. Moss

John H. Moss founded the current South Atlantic League in 1960. He has been the only President in the history of the "modern" SAL. Moss kept the "Sally League" together during some lean years in the 1960's and 70's. Moss now heads a dynamic league of 16 teams in eight states. Moss has the longest tenure of any Minor League President. Moss was given a lifetime contract by the SAL Board of Directors at the Winter Meetings in Nashville, TN, in 1989. Moss was named "King of Baseball" in 1990 and received the prestigious Warren E. Giles Award in 1993, recognizing his outstanding service as a League President. Moss has served as the Chairman of the Executive Committee of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues, Inc., and currently serves as Vice Chairman of the Council of League Presidents.

H. B. Spec Richardson

H. B. Spec Richardson

"Spec" Richardson is a longtime baseball executive and Columbus native who began his career with Columbus in the SAL in 1946. Richardson went on to become Executive Vice President and General Manager of the Houston Astros and was directly responsible for the construction of the Astrodome. He later became the General Manager of the San Francisco Giants where he was named Major League "Executive of the Year" in 1978.

Frank Robinson

Frank Robinson

Frank Robinson hit .336 with 25 HR and 110 RBIs for Columbia in 1954. He led the SAL in runs in 1954 with 112. Robinson became a major league star by slugging 586 home runs in 21 big league seasons. Robinson played in five (5) World Series, hitting six (6) home runs. He became the first African-American manager in major league history when he took over the reigns as the skipper of the Cleveland Indians in 1975. Robinson was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982.

Nolan Ryan

Nolan Ryan

Nolan Ryan recorded a 17-2 record at Greenville in 1966, finishing the season in the majors with the New York Mets. Ryan holds major league career records for seasons played, seasons pitched, strikeouts, no-hitters, among others. He also holds various major league single season records for strikeouts. Ryan collected 324 wins in his major league career. He pitched in four (4) League Championship Series, one (1) World Series, and eight (8) All-Star Games.

Ryne Sandberg

Ryne Sandberg

Led the SAL in games played (136) and AB (539) with Spartanburg in 1979. Sandberg won nine (9) Gold Gloves from 1983-1991 and was widely regarded as the best second baseman in baseball while with the Chicago Cubs. Sandberg has major league career marks for fielding percentage (.990) and most consecutive errorless games (123) by a second baseman.

Willie Stargell

Willie Stargell

Willie Stargell was a member of the Asheville Tourists in the SAL in 1961. Stargell hit 475 home runs in his 21-year major league career and led the National League in homers twice. Stargell led the Pittsburgh Pirates to six (6) League Championship Series and two (2) World Series. He was named Co-MVP of the National League in 1979. Stargell was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1987.

Sparky Anderson

Sparky Anderson

Managed at Rock Hill in the Western Carolina League in 1965 before leading the Asheville Tourists to the Southern League title in 1966. Managed the Cincinnati "Big Red Machine" teams that won World Series Championships in 1975 & 1976. Anderson also managed the Detroit Tigers to a World Series Championship in 1984. Anderson will be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame as a member of the Class of 2000.

James

James "Jimmy" Bragan

Hit .308 for Columbia in the South Atlantic League in 1955. Bragan also played for Savannah and Macon in the SAL. Bragan was a scout for Cincinnati from 1958-1966 and was a long-time Major League coach for the Reds, Expos, and Brewers before becoming President of the Southern League.

Leland

Leland "Lou" Brissie

Left-handed pitcher who played for Savannah in the SAL in 1946-47. On nights when Brissie would pitch, crowds would number from 6,000-11,000, often with fans seated on the grass in the outfield. Brissie, a war hero, was badly injured in Italy during WWII in 1944. He pitched with a leg brace and posted a 23-5 record for Savannah in 1947. Brissie went on to play in the Major Leagues for the Philadelphia A's. He won 14 games for the 1948 A's and 16 games for the 1949 A's. Brissie played seven years in the Major Leagues. Brissie later served as the Commissioner of American Legion Baseball.

Harley Bowers

Harley Bowers

Long time Georgia sports writer and former Editor of the Macon Telegraph. Bowers covered minor league baseball in Albany and Macon. He was instrumental in spearheading the effort to renovate Luther Williams Field and return South Atlantic League baseball to Macon.

Steve Carlton

Steve Carlton

Steve Carlton was 10-1 with a 1.03 ERA for Rock Hill in 1964. He recorded 329 major league victories in a 24-year career, collecting four Cy Young Awards. Carlton holds numerous major league single season and career records. He participated in five (5) League Championship Series, four (4) World Series, and ten (10) All-Star Games. Carlton was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.

Ty Cobb

Ty Cobb

Ty Cobb played in the SAL's first season, 1904. He started in centerfield for Augusta in the League's inaugural game. Cobb, just 17 years-old, homered and doubled in that first game. Cobb hit .305 to lead the SAL in 1905. Cobb became a baseball legend with Detroit. His .367 lifetime average remains first all-time. Cobb's 2,245 runs also ranks first all-time and his 4,191 hits ranks second all-time. Cobb was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936.

Judge Julian Fine

Judge Julian Fine

Judge Fine has been active in Savannah baseball for more than 50 years and is known throughout the Savannah area as "Mr. Baseball". When times were bleak for baseball in Savannah, Judge Fine spent his personal time, money, and efforts to convince the major league clubs to come to town.

Danny Hayling

Danny Hayling

Danny Hayling went 22-9 (.760 winning percentage) with a 2.00 ERA and 174 strikeouts for the 1960 Hickory Rebels. His 24 complete games, 31 decisions, and 22 wins during the 1960 season remain South Atlantic League/Western Carolina League records today.


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