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06/22/2006 7:26 PM ET
Lumsden strong in Barons win at Rickwood Classic
Collaro's sacrifice fly in ninth beats Tennessee, 3-2
Tyler Lumdsen has given up two earned runs over 24 1/3 innings in his last three starts. (Kyle Carter/Birmingham Barons)

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The Birmingham Barons won the 11th annual Rickwood Classic on Thursday, edging the Tennessee Smokies, 3-2, on Thomas Collaro's ninth-inning sacrifice fly.

The matinee was played at Rickwood Field, the home of the Barons from 1910-86. Since 1996, the team has played one game a year at its old residence.

This year's Rickwood Classic commemorated Birmingham's time as an affiliate of the New York Yankees (1953-56). The Barons wore uniforms from that era, and the umpires and stadium personnel were dressed in period garb, as well. Former Yankees left-hander Tommy John threw out the first pitch.

Tennessee reliever Clint Goocher tossed a scoreless eighth inning before running into trouble in the ninth. Corey Smith led off with a walk and went to third on Cory Aldridge's single to right. Micah Schnurstein was walked intentionally to load the bases, setting up Collaro's game-winning fly ball.

Christopher Getz homered in the third inning to account for the Barons' first run, while Schnurstein hit an RBI double in the fourth.

The Smokies (2-2) got on the board in the second. Phil Avlas doubled, took third on a groundout and scored on a wild pitch. In the fourth, Avlas reached on third baseman Schnurstein's error and eventually scored on Alberto Gonzalez's single to left.

William Lamura (1-0) hurled a scoreless ninth to get the win for the Barons (2-2). Starter Tyler Lumsden turned in a strong effort, allowing two runs -- one earned -- on six hits over eight innings.

Goocher (3-5) took the loss in relief of Ross Ohlendorf, who allowed two runs on five hits over seven innings while striking out four.

Benjamin Hill is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues or its clubs.