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11/05/2007 12:58 PM ET
Former Mustang will return to coach Billings in '08
Tom Browning returns to team he started his career with 26 years ago
Tom Browning returns to the Billings Mustangs as pitching coach in 2008. He started his career with the Reds as a Mustangs pitcher in 1982. (Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

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BILLINGS, MT -- Tom Browning -- who pitched for Billings in 1982 and went on to win 123 Major League games -- has been named the Mustangs pitching coach for the 2008 season.

The Cincinnati Reds announced that Browning has accepted a position as pitching coach for the Mustangs and also will serve as pitching coach in extended Spring Training before reporting to Billings.

Browning -- who was born in Casper, Wyo. -- returns to the Mustangs 26 years after spending his first professional baseball season in Billings. Browning was the Reds ninth round pick in 1982.

He reported to Billings and went 4-8 with a 3.89 ERA for the Mustangs in 1982. The left-hander led the Pioneer League that year with 87 strikeouts in 88 innings pitched.

Three years later, Browning went 20-9 for the Reds and finished second to Vince Coleman in the 1985 National League Rookie of the Year voting.

On Sept. 16, 1988, Browning made history when he threw a perfect game against the Dodgers. He is the only Reds pitcher in club history to throw a perfect game. And his 20 wins in 1985 mark the last time the Reds have drafted and developed a 20-game winner entirely within the organization.

Browning is a member of the Billings Mustangs Hall of Fame and the Reds Hall of Fame. In his 10-year career with Cincinnati, Browning went 123-88 with a 3.92 ERA.

He pitched two games with Kansas City in 1995 before he retired. In addition to recently working for the Reds in Spring Training, Browning has been a guest announcer on television game broadcasts for the Dayton Dragons -- the Reds affiliate in the Midwest League.

This story was not subject to the approval of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues or its clubs.