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Daley, Gallagher suspended 50 games
Pair of third-round picks disciplined for positive drug tests
01/18/2013 5:30 PM ET
Gary Daley Jr., struck out 79 batters in 118 innings at Midland in 2012.
Gary Daley Jr., struck out 79 batters in 118 innings at Midland in 2012. (Shawn E. Davis/MiLB.com)
Oakland A's right-hander Gary Daley Jr., and free agent infielder Austin Gallagher were each handed 50-game suspensions on Friday for using banned substances.

Daley, 27, was suspended for 50 games without pay by the Office of the Commissioner after testing positive for Methylphenidate. He'll begin serving the ban at the start of the 2013 season.

A right-hander drafted by the Cardinals out of Cal-Poly in the third round of the 2006 Draft, Daley went 10-10 with a 5.11 ERA in 34 games (18 starts) last season with Double-A Midland in the Texas League. The 6-foot-3 California native, who signed with Oakland in 2010, also appeared in 11 Arizona Fall League games with Phoenix.

Methylphenidate is a drug used in the treatment of ADHD or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and is banned by Major League Baseball.

Gallagher, 24, was cited for using Methylhexaneamine. His suspension will be effective immediately upon signing with another Major League organization.

The left-handed first baseman appeared in 105 games with Class A Advanced Rancho Cucamonga in the Dodgers system last year, finishing with a .283 average, 15 homers and 74 RBIs. A third-rounder in the 2007 Draft out of Manheim Township High School (Lancaster, Pa.), the 6-foot-5 infielder had spent six seasons in the Los Angeles organization, hitting a career-best .293 in 2008.

Methylhexaneamine is a substance originally intended to be used as a nasal decongestant but is banned by Major League Baseball. It's believed to increase focus and energy. Potential side effects include nausea and stroke. The drug has been linked to some Minor Leaguers over the past two years since it's an ingredient in the pre-workout supplement Jack3d.

Danny Wild is an editor for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues or its clubs.
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