Skip to main content
jump to navigation
The Official Site of Minor League Baseball
Below is an advertisement.
Seven players traded by Rays, Padres
Torres, Forsythe headline deal also involving prospect Hahn
01/22/2014 3:10 PM ET
Matt Andriese is headed to the Rays after three seasons with the Padres.
Matt Andriese is headed to the Rays after three seasons with the Padres. (Shawn E. Davis/MiLB.com)

The deal may not have included the biggest name on the Hot Stove -- that honor belonging to new Yankees pitcher Masahiro Tanaka -- but it certainly involved the most names.

The Rays agreed to a deal with the Padres on Wednesday that sends left-handed reliever Alex Torres and right-handed prospect Jesse Hahn to San Diego for utilityman Logan Forsythe, right-handers Brad Boxberger, Matt Andriese and Matt Lollis and second baseman Maxx Tissenbaum.

Torres and Forsythe both headline their respective sides of the deal. The southpaw Torres thrived during his full-time move to the bullpen for the Rays last season, posting a 1.71 ERA and .159 opponents' batting average in 58 innings with the big club.

Forsythe showed versatility by spending time at second base, third base, shortstop and the outfield with the Padres in 2013 but put up a .214/.281/.332 line in 75 games. He is expected to give the Rays depth off the bench upon his arrival.

Hahn is the biggest Minor League prospect of the bunch, checking in at No. 18 on MLB.com's list of Rays farmhands at the end of the 2013 season. The 24-year-old right-hander dropped to the sixth round in the 2010 Draft after experiencing elbow issues at Virginia Tech and eventually underwent Tommy John surgery in 2011 that forced him to miss the entire season.

He made his full-season debut with Class A Advanced Charlotte in 2013 and posted a 2.15 ERA with 63 strikeouts, 18 walks and a 1.09 WHIP in 19 starts (67 innings) with the Stone Crabs.

Hahn gets high marks from scouts for his fastball, rated at 70 in MLB.com's last updated grades, to go with a developing curveball/slider/changeup mix. He'll try to break 100 innings for the first time as a pro when he joins the Padres system in 2014.

Going the other way are three pitchers -- Boxberger, Andriese, Lollis -- who should provide depth in the upper levels of the Rays' farm system.

Boxberger, who previously went to the Padres in the deal that sent Mat Latos to the Reds in December 2011, flashed dominant stuff with Triple-A Tucson each of the past two seasons with K/9s above 12 and FIPs below 2.00 during each campaign. The 25-year-old right-hander spent time with the big club during each of those two seasons and owns a 2.72 career ERA in 49 2/3 Major League innings.

Checking in at 6-foot-9 and 250 pounds, Lollis is most notable for his size but has slipped in terms of prospect status in recent years due to control issues. After posting a 2.12 ERA and 2.1 BB/9 rate at Class A Short-Season Eugene and Class A Fort Wayne in 2010, he's struggled at the higher levels with a 5.31 ERA and 3.7 BB/9 over 208 1/3 innings in Class A Advanced ball and a 6.08 ERA and 4.7 BB/9 in 74 Double-A frames.

Lollis moved to the bullpen full-time in 2013 and could thrive once again in a Rays system heralded for its ability to develop hurlers.

Andriese, on the other hand, produced solid numbers across the board with Double-A San Antonio and Triple-A Tucson last year. He held a 2.37 ERA in 15 starts for the Missions before his promotion to the Pacific Coast League for the first time in June. The 2011 third-rounder saw his ERA jump to 4.45 with Tucson, no thanks to a .332 BABIP, but his FIP was much more encouraging at 2.93.

Tissenbaum rounds out the Rays' haul as the only Minor League position player in the bunch. The former Stony Brook standout made his full-season debut with Fort Wayne in 2013, slashing .277/.365/.359 with 28 doubles, two homers and 49 RBIs in 111 games. The left-handed-hitting 22-year-old exhibited patience and a good eye at the plate, drawing 43 while fanning just 36 times.

Sam Dykstra is a contributor to MiLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues or its clubs.
MiLB.com Comments
Today on MiLB.com