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Germano is PERFECT in Syracuse
07/26/2011 10:22 PM ET

History was made Tuesday night as Justin Germano became the first pitcher in Columbus Clippers history to throw a perfect game, shutting down the Syracuse Chiefs 3-0.

Columbus came into tonight's game really struggling offensively, scoring one run in their last 18 innings of play. A fast start offensively was badly needed for Clippers and they got it in the top of the first inning. Tim Fedroff led off the game with a double down the right field. After a Jason Donald pop out and a Luis Valbuena groundout that allowed Fedroff to advance to third, Cord Phelps stepped to the plate with two outs and gave the Clippers an early 1-0 lead with an RBI double.

There would be more clutch hitting for Columbus in the top of second. Chad Huffman drew a two out walk. That was followed by a Paul Phillips single. It set the stage for Tim Fedroff who came up big with a two run triple that increased the Clippers advantage to 3-0 at that point.

Clippers starter Justin Germano had one of those nights on the mound where everything was working for him. Germano retired the first twenty four batters he faced through eight innings. In the bottom of the ninth, Germano went to work, hoping to achieve history. The first batter that he faced, Jhonaton Solano, flew out to center field for the first out. Jeff Frazier then flew out to left field for the second out. All that stood between him and perfection was Syracuse centerfielder Corey Brown. Germano struck out Brown and succeeded in throwing a perfect game, the first perfect game in Clippers history and the first thrown in International League play since 2003. It is the sixth no-hitter in Clippers history.

The Clippers and the Chiefs will be back at it on Wednesday night for game two of this series. Venezuelan right-hander Jeanmar Gomez (10-3) will start for Columbus and oppose Syracuse starter Brad Peacock (1-1). First pitch is scheduled for 7:00 pm.



This story was not subject to the approval of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues or its clubs.