Windy City beckons Eloy to The Show

Baseball's No. 3 prospect ready to make Major League debut

Eloy Jimenez batted .337/.384/.577 with 22 homers and 75 RBIs across two levels last season. (Chicago White Sox)

By Michael Avallone / MiLB.com | March 26, 2019 10:55 PM

Days after becoming a multi-millionaire, Eloy Jimenez now can call himself a Major Leaguer as well.

The No. 3 prospect in baseball will be on the Opening Day roster when the White Sox begin their season against the Royals in Kansas City. Two of baseball's top three prospects found out they would break camp as big leaguers Tuesday. The Padres' Fernando Tatis Jr. -- No. 2 overall prospect -- also was told he made the team.

Jimenez signed a $43 million contract last week, the largest deal ever given to a player without Major League service time. The top White Sox prospect hit .337/.384/.577 with a career-high 22 homers and 75 RBIs as he advanced from Double-A Birmingham to Triple-A Charlotte.

The 22-year-old has done nothing but shine since debuting in 2014. Although injuries have kept him from playing more than 112 games in a season, the outfielder developed into one of the Minor League's most fearsome sluggers. 

"It's the dream that all players want," Jimenez told MLB.com. "It's amazing. I feel really proud of the work I have done. It's really amazing when you are one step closer to the Majors. When I signed I said, 'It's not going to be too long,' and it wasn't."

Offseason MiLB include

Jimenez will break camp with Chicago despite a relative quiet Spring Training. The Dominican Republic native hit .243/.263/.459 with a pair of homers and six RBIs in 13 Cactus League games. 

Originally signed by the crosstown Cubs in 2013, Jimenez was the centerpiece of the deal that sent All-Star left-hander Jose Quintana to the North Side prior to the 2017 trade deadline. The Cubs also sent right-hander Dylan Cease to the White Sox. He's the club's No. 3 prospect.

Michael Avallone is a contributor to MiLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @MavalloneMiLB. This story was not subject to the approval of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues or its clubs.

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